Troubleshooting, Problem Solving

 

A few weeks ago, I posted about all the struggles I’ve been encountering in my Readers Workshop.      I’m a reading specialist.  Most of my career has been spent providing intervention to low readers to catch them up to their peers.    Give me a low reader, and I can determine why he/she is struggling and know how to close their reading gap.

But give me classroom full of readers at all different levels and with multiple behavior problems, and I’ve got more of a struggle.    Now that I’m back in the classroom, I’m experiencing what homeroom teachers around the country are dealing with, especially those in Title 1 schools, serving at risk populations of students.   TEACHING IS TOUGH, y’all!    I get it.    There is so much to do and so little time and resources and copies to do it in.

So, here I am a few weeks later, and the struggles are still there, but I’m tacking the problems one by one.     Here is a list of the issues I posted previously and a brief description of my troubleshooting.     My readers workshop is not all smooth sailing at this point, but I have been able to get to a place where I feel I’m better addressing my wide range of students’ needs.

 

 

img_5956   A picture of my messy desk in the midst of my research for solutions.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • Where do I fit the grade level lessons and activities in my plans?

FIRST STEPS SOLUTION:

I’m focusing on broad level phonics and comprehension skills each week whole group and differentiating the depth of work/mastery required, depending on the students’ reading development level.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • How do I provide support to those grade level activities so even my lowest readers can be successful?

FIRST STEPS SOLUTION:

The type of support differs depending on what I’m teaching: decoding or comprehension.    For decoding, I’m teaching the phonics skill to all the students, but then differentiating the word quantity and difficulty that students must learn.  For example, next week I’m teaching final consonant blends.  All the students will receive an overview of the skill and then each reading level group will practice and be tested on different word difficulty.    My emergent group will practice much fewer words than the on-grade level and above students in my room.

For comprehension, I’m again teaching the same grade level skill to all the students, but the practice materials and assessments are tailored to the students’ reading levels.  I like using http://www.readworks.org/ passages because they match the students’ Lexile levels, and they can be used for a variety of comprehension skills.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • Should I give a grade level specific phonics mini-lesson, even when it’s beyond 75% of my students’ instructional levels?    If not, then how do I choose the best mini-lesson that will be relevant to the various differentiated tasks the students will do in their groups?

FIRST STEP SOLUTION:

Some days, my mini-lessons are on grade level specific phonics skills.   Other days, I’ll teach short lessons on generic word solving strategies such as “Good Readers look for CHUNKS of words they know.”  Students then practice those decoding strategies in their independent and guided reading time and share during Closure of Readers Workshop.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • What’s the best way to manage the noise level and behaviors of the room during groups/center time?

SOLUTION:

Thank you, universe, for ClassDojo.    I leave it showing on my Promethean with the reading groups displayed.   The winning group each day receives small prize.   They’ve gotten pretty competitive about this.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • How do I train the students to stop interrupting my group?

SOLUTION:

Dojo has solved this one.  Interrupting is a behavior that makes students lose points.   Students will still try every now and then to interrupt, but after they lose points, they get peer pressure from their group members to stop repeating the behavior.   If it becomes a problem again, I will adjust the points deducted from each team for that behavior, and I think that will work.   If students lose 2 or 3 points for interrupting, they will self-monitor themselves and their group members.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • What are some of the best literacy activities for my students at each of their reading development stages?     What should my emergent students be doing?   What should my early readers work on?  What work can I give my on-level students that they could do independently?    How do I best challenge my advanced readers?  (Keep in mind, I have VERY VERY VERY limited printing and copying resources at my school.   So most of these activities must be paper-free.    That resource issue is contributing to the struggle)

FIRST STEPS SOLUTION:

This year, I’m relying heavily on Words Their Way because their sorting activities and games are organized by levels.  (Also our grade level used their spelling inventory as a benchmark common assessment at the start of the school year).  Using those assessment results and my own running record data, I placed my second grade students in four groups:

  1. Emergent (barely know letters and sounds)
  2. Letter-Name Alphabetic (limited sight words and decoding skills)
  3. Within Word (close to grade level)
  4. Syllables and Affixes (at or above grade level)

Student in each group are doing 2-3 word sorts a week, reading guided reading books, and playing sound and sight words games from my resource files (my favorites are from http://www.fcrr.org/).

 

 

 

Honestly, I need to beef up my games and activities for my highest reading group , beyond just the word sorts.     Because the majority of my teaching experience has been working with struggling readers, those are the most prevalent resources in my collection.

 

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PROBLEM:

  • What scope and sequence do I set up for all my groups so that they can all catch up and be on-grade level readers by the end of the year?  How do I accomplish that huge task when I can only meet with them 2-3 times per week?    (That’s why the activities I choose above must be of the highest quality.   Students must be learning and advancing in reading, even when they’re not at the kidney table with me.   Centers can’t just be “busy work”.)

FIRST STEPS SOLUTION:

The lowest reading groups are going to do more sorts a week to hopefully accelerate their progress.   The other reading groups are doing 2 sorts a week;  I plan to increase the lower groups to 3 sorts a week for a few months and then maybe even 4 sorts a week by the end of the year.     The lower groups also meet with myself or the Title 1 paraprofessional four days a week to experience more supervised guided reading and intervention activities.   This accelerated calendar should get the Emergent group to the middle of the Within Word curriculum by the end of the year, which would be 1.5 years of growth in 1 year, narrowing the achievement gap by half a year.

 

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PROBLEM

  • How I type all of this into a managed plan so that my grade level can understand and use these resources with their struggling students as well?

FIRST STEPS SOLUTION:

The whole group instruction follows a typical schedule, which should help my team with routine practices and expectations.    Mondays focus on the phonics skill of the week, Tuesdays are for sight words, and the other days of the week are for the word sorts, comprehension,  and decoding strategy minilessons and activities.    Interactive notebook pages are provided for the whole group skills, with 3 different pages for each skill (Easy, Middle, Challenging).     I think this is going well for my team, but you know each teacher has the power to shut their door and do what they think is best for the students, which I have no control over.  I’m just trying to suggest a variety of activities and resources that the team can use for their students, no matter the reading level.    Lastly, I’ve created a large resource folder on the network drive that everyone can access for Words their Way, center, and mini-lesson resources.  The “cloud” makes it so much easier to share files!

 

 

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